Menu

Dipesh Majumdar

Blog and Paintings

Praise

August 3, 2013

Commendable. 

Great...

Superb... Extraoridinary... Inspiring....

These are the typical words used to praise somebody. I mean, to praise somebody's effort in an urgent/critical juncture... when that person's efforts were really really crucial in achieving something...

The words of adulation are powerful... Oh boy they really are.

Because that takes away the pinch from the person going through all the hardships to achieve the target. It acts as a soothing balm ... It acts as a serious motivation - an infallible impetus to lift his spirits high...  and handsome over the limits of heights, thereby rendering thundering confidence.

Praise if you really need to - praise you must without any inhibition... with open arms and if you really feel that the recipient is worthy. You would achieve better results from the person whom you praise for sure and without fail. For the words of encouragement are very powerful. True words... not empty words. 

Because admiration, glorification and acknowledgement of real contribution can act as a catalyst to propel the recipient's contributions further... and further and further. He gets a boost... that nothing else is capable of rendering... He gets a high... He vows to contribute and perform even better, with greater intensity. 

Praise... as much as you want... provided,  the purpose is worthy and the contribution is vital... because praise lifts the ego high. And human beings by nature love to get their egos raised ... and then they are ready to do anything and everything.

Praise is a serious weapon... to get important assignments completed... to meet deadlines... to make that contributor contribute even further.

Praise is a trick. The recepient falls in a trap. He is helpless and he knows it but he can't help it.

If you are a manager, make good use of 'Praise.'

If you are under a manager, make him give a better rating in appraisal, a good salary hike, a promotion.

Tangible results are better than empty words.

Isn't it?

Go Back

Comment